Heirloom Apple Collection

This is the beginning compilation of the apples we grow. As next harvest begins we will update with more pictures and descriptions of all 120 varieties. Scroll to the bottom of the page to see when we traditionally begin to harvest these varieties. Happy reading!

Ananas ReinetteAnanas Reinette

This small yellow skinned apple was grown in France and Belgium in the 1850’s. It has a zesty, pineapple, citrus flavor and flesh that has a fine grain, crisp texture. Used mostly for eating out of hand, but is also a fine cooking apple and makes a robust juice or cider.

 
Ashmead's Kernel

Ashmead’s Kernel

Dr. Ashmead planted an apple seed in his garden in the early 1700s. It grew into a delicious variety that has won the highest awards from the Royal Horticultural Society. Kernel is another term for an apple tree grown from seed, and this one tastes like a crunchy lemon when it’s first picked and then the flavor mellows as the sugars develop. Ashmead has a fine grain flesh and is a “high acid, high sugar” apple like a Reinette. Smaller, golden russeted apple often with a red cheek.

 
Baldwin

Baldwin

A handsome, deep red apple originally from Massachusetts in the early 1700’s. There is a monument in Wilmington, MA where the original tree grew. This variety was the major New England apple until the 1930’s when a terrible freeze killed most of the trees. It is a hard apple, sometimes referred to as the woodpecker. It has the quintessential apple flavor and back in the day when pie was made for breakfast, it was a very hearty meal. This was the New Englanders apple of choice.

 
Belle

Belle de Boskoop

This apple is originally from the Netherlands and has a tart, sprightly flavor. It is a superb cooking apple and is the only apple considered suitable for making authentic strudel. Boskoops picked later in the fall are much sweeter and are excellent for fresh use. Very large apple greenish-orange, lightly russeted skin.

 
Sheeps Nose 1

Black Gilliflower or Sheep’s Nose

A New England variety from the early 1800’s. Traditionally it’s used as a cooking apple due to its rich flavor and aromatic quality though many prefer it for fresh use. Gilliflower refers a clove flavor and black refers to the color the skin sometimes gets as it ripens. It’s also known as “Sheep’s Nose” because of its unusual shape, which tapers towards the base.

 
Black Oxford

Black Oxford

From Oxford County, Maine. A handsome apple from the early 1800’s, it was the regional favorite for eating, cooking and making cider. This variety keeps so well that it is sometimes referred to as “the rock.” You can still find some of these old trees in the pastures and barn yards in Maine. Oxfords tend to be medium sized, deep purple to black skin with light russeting with a greenish-white flesh.

 
Blue Pearmain

Blue Pearmain

A New England apple dating back to the early 1700’s. Henry David Thoreau wrote in his journal about his preference for Blue Pearmain. The crisp, rich flavor makes it a good apple for fresh eating and baking. Large purple-blue skin with light russeting.

 
Bramleys Seedling

Bramley’s Seedling

This apple dates back to 1803, in Nottinghamshire, England. It was and remains the most popular culinary apple in England. It’s excellent for pies, baked apples or combined with other apples for a crisp. This apple is very high in vitamin C. A green, rubenesque apple with a red cheek.

 
Caville

Calville Blanc d’Hiver

A French apple dating to 1598 with a champagne-like flavor and a wonderful texture when cooked. Of all the French apples, this one is considered the best to cook with because of its flavor and texture. It makes an excellent Tarte Tatin. Calville has a yellow skin with a red blush. Its shape is deeply lobed, often resembling a crown.

 

Chenango Strawberry

An apple from New York in the mid 1800’s. It is crisp, juicy and sweet. Some say it gets its name from the shape and color, while others say they taste a distinct strawberry flavor. We have a very limited crop and usually sell out quickly.

 
Claygate

Claygate Pearmain

A fawn-colored, small russeted apple originally found growing in a hedgerow in Surrey England in the 1820s. Crisp, juicy with an aromatic honey flavor.

 
Red Cortland

Cortland

A popular cooking apple which came from upstate New York in the late 1880’s. It’s a large, crisp apple with a green skin and red stripes. The flesh doesn’t oxidize rapidly so that cut slices stay white. It makes a beautiful pink sauce. A traditional favorite for pies or baked apples.

 
Cox's

Cox’s Orange Pippin

The most popular of English apples, it has been awarded the highest honors by the Royal Horticultural Society. It was originally grown from seed (hence the name Pippin) in 1825 by Richard Cox, an amateur horticulturist. Its tart, citrus flavor is exquisitely tempered by a sweet pear flavor. It is excellent for eating and cooking. A small, round apple with orange skin, sometimes with some russeting.

 
D Spice

D’Arcy Spice

A green, russeted apple originally from Essex, England. It has a crisp, aromatic, nutmeg flavor. This apple was traditionally picked on Guy Fawkes Day and hung in cloth bags from the tree limbs until December. One of our favorite apples here, the last apple we pick in the harvest season.

 
Dolgo (2)

Dolgo Crab

These tangy crabapples originally came from Kazakhstan several hundred years ago. With an intense, zesty flavor similar to cranberries, their best use is in sauces, sorbets, chutney or as a condiment for meat or poultry. They make a beautiful rose-colored jelly. These have become very popular for hard cider. During harvest the crew will often suck on Dolgos for an energy boost to help finish filling that last apple bin late in the day. Small, cranberry red.

 
Duchess

Duchess of Oldenburg

One of the finest cooking apples available, good for pies and sauces or crisps. Originally from Russia, it was introduced to the US around 1835. It was one of the main varieties first planted in the Scott Farm orchards in 1912. This apple stores well – we keep them in our cooler through September. A yellow-skinned apple with streaks of red.

 
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Empire (not an heirloom)

A well known all around use apple. It has the best qualities of each of its parents, the McIntosh and the Red Delicious. A handsome red apple good for eating out of hand, it also makes a great crisp, and a good sweet cider apple.

 
Esopus Spitzenburg

Esopus Spitzenburg

Thomas Jefferson grew this variety at Monticello and it is said to be one of his favorite apples. It is considered one of the best highly flavored eating apples in America. It originally came from New York in the 1700’s. A blocky shaped apple with reddish-orange skin.

 
Snow 2

Fameuse/Snow Apple

This aromatic, crisp apple was the “famous apple.” Originally from Quebec, it was planted in the early 1600’s. One hundred years later, it was grown extensively in Northern New England. Zeke Goodband, Scott Farm’s orchard manager, found an old Fameuse tree in a farm yard in Maine and brought cuttings from it to Scott Farm. It is best for fresh use and is similar to McIntosh for cooking. A green skin with a red blush, similar to a McIntosh.

 
Franc 2

Franc Rambour

Rambour is the name in France given to a group of varieties characterized by large size and a ribbed, flat-sided shape. Rambour Franc is the best known and oldest of these, believed to have been from the village of Rambure. Recorded in 1535 by a French botanist and known in England around 1665. Widely grown throughout the continent and still found in French gardens. Large fruit, green with red stripes. Breaking, crisp, exceptionally juicy, aromatic flesh. Good for eating and sauce.

 
Fuji

Fuji (not an heirloom)

A sweet, crisp apple from Japan which has only been grown in the US since the mid 1990’s. This apple stays crisp and is a good “keeper.” It is best for eating out of hand or in salads, but is also a good baked apple with a little maple syrup on top. Smooth-skinned apple with light red to pink color.

 
Gala

Gala(not an heirloom)

This is the most aromatic apple that we grow and the favorite of children who come to visit the orchard. It has an orange color and a sweet, crisp flavor. This tends to be a smaller apple, just the right size for lunch boxes.

 
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Ginger Gold(not an heirloom)

A large yellow skinned apple which sometimes has a red blush. It is crisp and slightly sweet with a rich flavor. This apple has only been around for 20 years, but has become a popular early season apple. Available through mid-September.

 
Golden Russet

Golden Russet

An English apple from the late 1600’s, it has a dense flesh with a honeyed flavor and a touch of citrus. Its juicy flesh makes it good for fresh use and baking, but it is especially sought after for cider making. Medium size apple with russeting, known as a leather-coat apple.

 
Gravenstein

Gravenstein

A very old apple from Italy, grown in the USA since the late 1700s. The combination of both tart and sweet flavors makes this a wonderful culinary apple for pies, tarts, and sauces as well as a sprightly flavored eating apple. Good too when pressed as a single variety sweet cider. It’s available mid- August through mid-September. Large yellow green smooth skin with red blush.

 
Greening

Greening’s Rhode Island

Grown by Mr. Greening at his inn and tavern near Newport, Rhode Island. Although it is a good eating apple, it excels in baked goods. Pies made with this apple have won awards all over the world. Legend has it that this variety came from the tree of knowledge in the Garden of Eden. Large clear-green skin, tart flavor, often mistaken for Granny Smith.

 
Hewes 2

Hewes Virginia Crab

Hewes Virginia Crab was grown in Thomas Jefferson’s orchard in Virginia circa the 1700’s for crafting hard cider. This little sugar bomb has a very sweet flavor with a bold traditional crab apple kick. Excellent for snacking or making crab apple jelly. This apple is a petite pink gem.

 
Hidden Rose

Hidden Rose (not an heirloom)

This apple was happily discovered in the 1960’s. The Hidden Rose Apple is a crunchy apple with a tart taste reminiscent of strawberry lemonade. They are mainly eaten out of hand, but their firm texture makes them great for cooking too. The pale green skin hides a shock of bright pink flesh giving the apple its name, Hidden Rose. A true aesthetic and culinary delight.

 
Holstein

Holstein

A German apple from the early 1900’s, thought to be an offspring of Cox’s Orange Pippin. A crisp apple with a citrus flavor and a sprightly balance of sugars and acids. Sometimes there is a hint of pear. Good for eating and cooking. Tends to be a large apple with orange-reddish skin. Very juicy, this is a good apple to blend in with other apples in a pie or tart.

 
Honeycrisp

Honeycrisp (not an heirloom)

This apple is one of the most popular on the market today. A new American variety developed in Minnesota in 1991. They grow very well in Vermont and are picked when tree ripe. They have a refreshing blend of tart and sweet, with a crisp, breaking flesh, which means that a chunk breaks off when bitten into. Orange-colored skin with a red blush.

 
Hubbardston Nonesuch

Hubbardston Nonesuch

The pride of Hubbardston, MA in the late 1700’s. For generations, this apple has been highly regarded as a dessert, or fresh use apple, although it’s also very good in crisps and pies. “Nonesuch” was an Americanized version of the French term “nonpareil,” which was used to describe apples of the finest flavor. A beautiful clear red skinned apple, this is one of the best early season heirlooms that we grow.

 
Hudson Golden Gem

Hudson’s Golden Gem

An American apple from the early 1900’s. The original tree was a “chance seedling” found growing in a hedgerow. This golden russeted apple has a crisp, sweet flesh with a ripe pear flavor. This is one of the favorite apples at our tastings.

 
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Jonagold (not an heirloom)

A crisp, juicy apple with a sprightly mix of sweet and tart flavors. A cross between Jonathan and Golden Delicious, it’s originally from New York. Our Jonagold is the original strain that came from New York state in the 1970’s.

 
Karmijn 1

Karmijn de Sonnaville

Originally from the Netherlands, it has a robust flavor with a hint of citrus. If you like a tart, crisp apple for cooking or eating, this is an excellent choice

 
Knobbed Russet 1

Knobbed Russet

A lumpy, russeted apple from the early 1800’s sometimes known as “old maid in winter.” It has a delightfully crisp, sprightly flesh with a citrus overtone. This is another apple we grow that originally came from England.

 
Lady

Lady Apple

This is the oldest apple still being grown today, originally from France, these apples date back to the 1500’s. Because it was a small and flavorful apple, it was popular during the Renaissance, when ladies would keep one tucked away in their bosom and taken out to freshen their breath. Also known as the Christmas Apple, it was used for decorations. Yellow-green skin with a red cheek.

 
Lamb Abbey Pearmain

Lamb Abbey Pearmain

This is one of the most delightful apples in the world. 200 years ago, Mary Malcomb planted an apple pip, or seed, in her garden in Lamb Abbey, England. The fruit from the tree that grew was crisp and coarsely textured. The flavor is a lively blend of sugars and acids and pineapple, which becomes more pronounced as the harvest moves later into the fall. A small apple with light green skin with a reddish-orange blush.

 
Maidens Blush 2

Maiden’s Blush

This apple was grown for cooking and the “evaporation trade” or dried apples. It is an American apple originating in the late 1700’s. When apples were an important part of a familys winter food supply, almost every farm had one or two Maiden trees. Good for cooking, eating fresh, drying, or cider. Yellow, squat, round apple with a red blush.

 
Macoun

Macoun (not an heirloom)

A deep red, flatish apple with a sweet, crisp, white breaking flesh. A popular farm stand apple, developed by Professor Macoun of Nova Scotia in the 1940’s.

 
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McIntosh

The original McIntosh is from Ontario, Canada. The flavor is slightly tart, with a crisp and aromatic flesh.

 

Picture soon to come!

Muscadet de Bernay

A French apple from Bernay with high tannin and sugar content and a bitter-sharp flavor.

 
Newtown Pippin

Newtown Pippin

This variety originated as a chance seedling in Queens County on Long Island, New York in the early eighteenth century and was the most famous colonial American apple. It was widely grown by George Washington and Thomas Jefferson, who wrote from Paris that “they have no apples here to compare with our Newtown Pippin.” In 1838 the American minister to Great Britain presented Queen Victoria with a gift basket of these apples and in response Parliament lifted the import duties. It is one of the best keeping apples.

 
Northern Spy

Northern Spy

The best use for this apple is for cooking, though it is admired for eating as well. Introduced in the mid 1800’s, it keeps well if refrigerated. It was named after James Fenmore Cooper’s novel, “The Spy,” which was very popular during this time. Spys tend to be large, reddish, smooth-skinned apples with bright white, crisp, juicy flesh.

 
Opalescent

Opalescent

This is an American heirloom that emerged during the latter part of the 19th century. The skin of this apple glows a brilliant ruby red with slight russeting. The flavor is sprightly and the flesh quite crisp.

 
Orleans Reinette

Orleans Reinette

According to our orchard manager, this is “One of the most handsome apples on the planet.” Grown in France for hundreds of years, it has a flattened shape with a russeted, rosy cheek. It has a combination of citrus and nutty flavors, and makes for a good cooking apple as well as for eating out of hand. The famous English food writer, Edward Bunyard, enjoyed his Orleans Reinettes with port wine.

 
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Paulared (not an heirloom)

Best for fresh use, or as we say in the orchard business, eaten out of hand. Mildly tart flesh is also good for pies and applesauce. It’s available through mid-September. Dark red skin, crisp white flesh.

 
Pinova

Pinova (not an heirloom)

A very new German apple that is a relative of the Cox’s Orange Pippin. A blend of sweet and tart flavors makes this variety a favorite. Small conic shape, orange skin.

 
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Pitmaston Pineapple

Raised in England around 1785, it has a sharp yet sweet, honeyed flesh. Small, golden yellow covered in fawn russet sometimes with a pineapple or honey-nut flavor.

 

Red Astrakan

Our first eating apple of the new season was originally from Russia. It is said that cuttings were brought to this country by Swedish immigrants in the early 1800’s. It’s good for fresh eating or sliced into yogurt or cereal and is also an old favorite for pies and sauce. The flesh is soft, with a sprightly flavor. A large red- striped apple.

Reine des Reinette 3

Reine des Reinettes

A French apple from the 1700’s which has a high sugar content that’s balanced with acidity. It’s a juicy apple, good for eating out of hand or with a knife. It is also good for cooking and in Normandy it is considered the best apple for making hard cider. One of the top favorites at the tastings here on the farm. A large, beautiful apple, red blush with russeting.

 
Ribston

Ribston Pippin

This apple goes back to 1708 in Yorkshire England. The original tree grew from seeds from Normandy. It is a parent of Cox’s Orange Pippin but is sweeter, with a delightful pear flavor. Good for both fresh eating and culinary use. Ribston is a recent favorite when we have tastings at the farm. Reddish skin, some orange and light russeting.

 
Roxbury Russet1

Roxbury Russet

This is the oldest American apple variety. Some folks say the flavor is similar to guava and the texture like a coconut. It has a very high sugar content, though you may not notice it due to the other complex flavors. Cider made from this apple is like nectar, it is so thick and sweet. A medium size apple with russeted skin, it is known as a leather-coat apple.

 
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Sansa (not an heirloom)

A Japanese apple that is crisp, juicy, sweet and has ripe-pear flavor. It’s an offspring of the Gala and is Scott Farm’s most popular early season apple. It’s available through mid-September. Small apple with an orange-red blush over gold.

 
Shizuka

Shizuka(not an heirloom)

A large green and yellow Japanese apple, often with a red blush, that is similar to Mutsu. Sweet, crisp and juicy it is a favorite in our apple CSA.

 
Sops of Wine

Sops of Wine

An old English apple with a wine-like flavor. It’s similar to Hubbardston and is excellent for cooking or cider-making. Juicy, crisp, red apple.

 
20 oz

Twenty Ounce

From the mid 1850’sthis American apple is by far the largest one we grow. It’s tart, zesty flavor makes it a favorite for pies and baking. It is also good for fresh use, but you’ll need some help finishing this huge apple! Green skin with red blush.

 

Picture soon to come!

Wickson

A crab-sized apple that may be an offspring of Newtown Pippin and Esopus Spitzenburg. A crisp apple with just a touch of acidity used primarily in hard cider. In a great year they yield 25 Brix. Red skin.

 
Winesap

Winesap

A popular apple in the mid-Atlantic states, Winesap originated about 1817. It has a coarse grain and a very crisp, juicy white flesh. When ripe they have enough sugar to balance the strong, tart flavor. Excellent for both eating out of hand, cooking, and cider. Stores well. A medium sized red apple.

 
Winter Banana

Winter Banana

A late maturing apple originating in Indiana in 1876, it has a beautiful pale yellow color with a red blush and a banana aroma. Its sweet and tart combination make it a good eating, cooking, and juicing apple.

 
Wolf River

Wolf River

This apple is from Wisconsin around the mid 1800’s. It became a very popular culinary apple in New England. They were so popular that they were packed in barrels and shipped to England. It’s a wonderful pie and baking apple. Sometimes one apple was enough to make a pie. Deep red skin with a bright white flesh.

 
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Yellow Transparent

Dr. Hoskins of Newport, Vermont introduced this Russian apple to the USA in 1870. It became very popular and almost every farmstead had a tree. The flesh is soft and tart. Traditionally a sauce apple, it is one of the first fresh apples of the season. Pale yellow, smooth skin.

 
Zaber

Zabergau Reinette

This apple is from the Zaber River region in Germany. It has sugary, sweet, walnut flavor that develops after it sits for a while. It’s excellent for cooking, sauces, and eating. A medium to large apple with russet skin

 
AUGUST 1Red AstrakanYellow Transparent

AUGUST 10

Duchess of Oldenburg

AUGUST – MID

Gravenstein

Dolgo Crab

AUGUST 23

Paulared

Sansa

Ginger Gold

Franc Rambour

Chenango Strawberry

SEPTEMBER 8

Hubbardston Nonesuch

Gala

McIntosh

SEPTEMBER 12

Lamb Abbey Pearmain

Pitmaston Pineapple

SEPTEMBER 16

Holstein

Cortland

Wolf River

Ananas Reinette

Honeycrisp

SEPTEMBER 21

Karmijn de Sonnaville

Cox’s Orange Pippin

Reine des Reinettes

Pinova

Maiden’s Blush

Fameuse/Snow Apple

Macoun

SEPTEMBER 28

Belle de Boskoop

Empire

Blue Pearmain

Hidden Rose

OCTOBER 1

Claygate Pearmain

Ashmead’s Kernel

Hudson’s Golden Gem

Sops of Wine

Shizuka

Bramley’s Seedling

Jonagold

OCTOBER 5

Calville Blanc d’Hiver

Ribston Pippin

Twenty Ounce

Orleans Reinette

Lady Apple

Knobbed Russet

Greening’s Rhode Island

Golden Russet

OCTOBER 7

Black Gilliflower or Sheep’s Nose

Esopus Spitzenburg

Zabergau Reinette

Wickson

Foxwhelp

Kingston Black

OCTOBER 10

Roxbury Russet

Baldwin

Northern Spy

Black Oxford

OCTOBER 14

Fuji

Winesap

Winter Banana

D’Arcy Spice

The Newtown Pippin

Muscadet de Bernay

Other fruits:

OCTOBER – EARLY

Quince

Aromatic fruit belonging, like apples, to the rose family. Best for baking with apples, preserves or roasting with game or meat dishes. A truly fragrant fruit!

OCTOBER – MID

Medlars

Ancient fruit once popular throughout Europe and still popular in the Middle East. It also belongs to the rose family and resembles a brown rose hip which needs to soften or blett before eating. The flavor resembles a persimmon. Some people say it tastes like a very “cinnamony” apple sauce.